A Big Mac Mystery

The Economist created the Big Mac Index in 1986 to compare the price of the Big Mac in different countries. Their goal, they said, was to make exchange rate talk more “digestible.” However, the January 16 Index also generated some…

What Can We Learn From a Big Mac?

About much more than just a burger, the Big Mac Index can help us compare purchasing power and the GDP in different countries.

Why Venezuelans Might Launder (In a Washing Machine) Their Dollars

The U.S. dollar is a handy backup when a country’s currency loses its value. After Zimbabwe’s hyperinflation hit its peak (or its nadir) in 2009, they used U.S. dollars but didn’t have enough. So, when the cash got too gray…

A Lot For a Latte?

We can get the most latte for our loot in Cairo. At the equivalent of $1.53, a Cairo tall latte is close to one-half the $3.45 price of one in the U.S. On the other hand, a tall latte in Zurich…

What We Can Learn From Big Mac Prices

Based on the January 2017 Big Mac Index, we can get the most burger for our buck in Egypt. At the equivalent of $1.46, an Egyptian Big Mac is less than one-third the $5.06 U.S. price. On the other hand, a Big Mac…

The Yuan Devaluation and the Big Mac Index

Showing the purchasing power of different currencies and under-and overvaluation, the Big Mac Index can provide an understanding of the yuan devaluation.

Weekly Roundup: From New Drachma to Old Monetary Dilemmas

Our everyday economics includes foreign exchange, human capital, economic growth, GDP, inflation, unemployment, monetary policy, tradeoffs and deleveraging.

Where to Spend the Most on a Big Mac

Displaying foreign exchange fluctuation, the price of a Big Mac in different countries can be compared to show if a currency is over- or undervalued.