The Feminine Side of City Streets

A headline in the Brooklyn Eagle asks us to imagine a New York where most of the streets are named for women. As they describe their alternative world, we could have Barbra Streisand Lane and Ethel Merman Boulevard. Female names…

Celebrating Wikipedia’s Birthday

During a 2007 episode of The Office, Michael Scott (Steve Carell) said Wikipedia was “the best thing ever.” His reason? “Anyone in the world can write anything they want on any subject.” The show’s writers thought they had Michael expressing…

Signs of Gender Equity

With signs that increase gender equality in public spaces, a female presence can be explicitly recognized and affect infrastructure design and jobs.

How Tariffs Target Women

Looking at the retail tilt of the newest round of Trump administration tariffs, we would see that woman will be hit harder than men.

The Athletic Programs That Score High for Gender Bias

With a poor hiring record for female college coaches, many universities and athletic conferences have received dismal gender bias grades.

Choosing Between Male and Female Bosses

Resulting in gender job discrimination and talent underutilization, past practice shapes future preference when choosing men as bosses and athletic coaches.

Gender Issues: What If We No Longer Said “He” and “She”?

Our Monday Gender Issue: In the February 10th issue of the New Yorker, I read “Pronoun Envy” by Anne Carson. Here is the beginning: Pronoun Envy “is a phrase coined by Cal Watkins of the Harvard Linguistics Department in November…

Gender Issues: Is Your Alma Mater Biased?

Reminiscing during our lunch together, a female friend who attended law school during the 1970s recalled a professor starting classes with, “Good morning, gentleman.” He also seemed to enjoy saying that the women in the class were sitting in the…

Gender Matters

For years, female musicians said that they were being treated unfairly. The problem, they claimed, was audition bias. Many more men were selected for orchestras than women. The response was that the men were better. A Harvard and Princeton study…