Elaine Schwartz
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Elaine Schwartz has spent her career sharing the interesting side of economics. At the Kent Place School in Summit, NJ, she has been honored through an Endowed Chair in Economics and the History Department chairmanship. At the same time, she developed curricula and wrote several books including Understanding Our Economy (originally published by Addison Wesley as Economics Our American Economy) and Econ 101 ½  (Avon Books/Harper Collins). Elaine has also written in the Encyclopedia of New Jersey (Rutgers University Press) and was a featured teacher in the Annenberg/CPB video project “The Economics Classroom.” Beyond the classroom, she has presented Econ 101 ½ talks and led workshops for the Foundation for Teaching Economics, the National Council on Economic Education and for the Concord Coalition.

Butter, Buildings, and Baumol’s Disease

New Chicago Fed head Austan Goolsbee and a U. of Chicago colleague try to solve the mystery of lagging construction industry productivity.

How We Disagree About Deglobalization

While the conventional wisdom says that the world is fragmenting, it is likely that there is much less deglobalization than we think.

What We Expect From Online Dating

The closer we look at online dating markets, the more we see differences in the firms, the users, and the attitudes.

Our Weekly Economic News Roundup: From Less Water to More Money

Connecting economics, current events, and history, this week’s economic news roundup ranges from female filmmakers to new Nigerian money.

February 2023 Friday’s e-links: Why We Need to “Turn Every Page”

Starting our February e-links, I recommend a New York Public Library talk on YouTube from two literary legends.

Why It’s Not Easy to Use Less of the Colorado River

Complicated by centuries of obligations, and conflicts between cities and farmers, Colorado River problems are tough to solve.

Why Federal Spending Cuts Come After Raising the Debt Ceiling

We can look at the federal budget to see why the debt ceiling should be raised before debating federal spending tradeoffs.

What We Need to Know About Our Food’s Carbon Footprint

At Chipotle or Panera Bread, we might see the carbon footprint food labels that are starting to proliferate.

What Money Should Look (and Feel) Like

Perhaps unaware of the criteria for the most functional currency, Nigeria’s new money designers might not have solved its old problems.

What Movie Makers Say About Gender

Looking behind-the-scenes at women in film jobs, a NY Times critic cites progress from rather dismal figures.