Back to the Future: Standard Oil and Amazon?

Today’s “Back to the Future” looks back to the 1911 Standard Oil Supreme Court breakup decision and then at Amazon’s antitrust concerns.

What We Might Not Know About Big Tech

Comparing the companies called big tech, we can see the similar ways that they grew, diversified, and became increasingly powerful.

How Tiger Woods Helped Nike Sell Golf Balls

At $20 million a year for 30 years, a sports marketing expert said Hideki Matsuyama could “unlock $600 million in endorsements” because of yesterday’s Masters win at Augusta National. It’s all about the hats and the shirts. Let’s take a…

Learn With Elaine: How Subway Competes

Sometimes competition can determine how a fast food firm like Subway behaves.

Food and Drink Fights

Orthodox gin distillers say that juniper should be its main flavor. The U.K Gin Guild however says it’s okay if craft makers introduce other flavors like toffee. Then, there is a second rule. And that is the problem. Gin Labels…

All You Could Ever Want to Know About the Subway Footlong

If you live in New York, the BMT is the Brooklyn Manhattan Transit system. However, to another group of Subway users, it means, “Biggest, Meatiest, Tastiest.” While Subway created the B.M.T. in 1975, you still can order an Italian B.M.T.…

Why Our Root Beer Needs a New Label

A&W Root Beer tells us that it’s made with Aged Vanilla: Not necessarily. Real and Artificial Vanilla Flavor Our story starts in Madagascar where 80 percent of the world’s vanilla is produced. Growing up tree trunks, vanilla is a labor-intensive…

How Super Bowl LV Is Different

On January 30, 2000, 11 start-ups ran Super Bowl ads. Within just a year, eight were gone because of a bankruptcy or a buyout. $2 million or so was a lot for a young firm to spend: 2021 Super Bowl…

Why Coca-Cola Is Going After the Zombies

Looking at how Coke competes, we can see that they believe less is more as they discontinue hundreds of brands like Tab.

The Story of a New Apple (Called the SnapDragon)

Similar in some ways to Apple’s iPhone 12, Cornell University has developed two new apples that reflect years of research and development.