Why We Have a Chores Gap

Especially evident during pandemic lockdowns, at home we have a chores gap that determines who does the housework.

What We Can Learn From a Gnome Shortage

At home because of Covid, many of us have been busy in our backyards. We’ve needed more seeds, tools, and gnomes. And that is the problem. At one garden center in the U.K., they’ve not seen a gnome for six…

Will Money Make You Happy?

While it is tough to do happiness studies, the economists that keep trying have begun to conclude that money could indeed relate to our life satisfaction.

Creating the Best Valentine’s Match

New marriage markets involve couples with consumption complementarities and online dating that the work of Nobel Economics Laureate Al Roth is facilitating.

Tradeoffs and Marriage: Like a Horse and Carriage

As the pill, education and employment opportunities changed the value of women as wives, the tradeoffs that relate to being married have also changed.

Using Prediction Markets to Catch Match-Fixing at Wimbledon

When supply and demand in tennis match prediction markets created illogical prices, researchers said that 3 matches at Wimbledon might have been fixed.

Surprising Hand-To-Mouth Households

Close to one third of all households (38 million) in the US live hand-to-mouth. Like me, perhaps you have always assumed that a hand-to-mouth (HtM) household is low income. Spending all disposable income each week, the hand-to-mouth household is unable…

A New Reason to Marry

Traditionally, marriage has been about specialization and “production complementarities.” With the husband in the labor force and the wife at home, their division of labor resembled a small factory. He supplied the income and she was the “domestic specialist.” As in the…

Economic Humor: Economic Valentines

I discovered these wonderful economic Valentines at Freakonomics.com. They were created by Elisabeth Fosslien.                This #FedValentine is from econlife: Roses are nice but money we exalt, Be my Valentine and you get the (gold)…

Monkeys, Economics and Happiness

Behavioral economists might be able to explain our response to income inequality. In a paper on money and happiness, economist Richard Easterlin initially asks the reader how she feels if her income rises. Then he asks how she reacts when…