What To Do About An X-Date

If the congress does not retain a suspended debt ceiling or raise it, we would quickly see why Alexander Hamilton was right about the public credit.

Why Taxes Are About More Than Money

Because tax systems matter, we can look at tax evasion in the U.K., at IRS problems in the U.S., and at the OECD to see what works.

A Brief and Basic Primer On the Federal Debt

Knowing that the trillions spent on pandemic relief will accelerate the growth of the federal debt, we can ask where we will get money.

Where State Money Can Come From

Billions of dollars of pandemic rescue money was added to state revenue dollars that varied in size and source from place to place.

When a Beard Is Like a Window

Although beard and window taxation were in different countries for different reasons, both relate to Willie Sutton and where the money is.

What Can We Learn From Japan?

Looking back at the Japanese economy and ahead at the United States, we can ask if we will have similar fiscal and monetary results.

The Corporate Tax Rates That Are Not What They Appear To Be

Right now, the U.S. corporate tax rate is close to the world average:   But, if other OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development) countries agree with Janet Yellen, we could wind up with a global minimum corporate tax for…

The Economic Side of a License Plate

Long ago, someone figured out that we needed a license plate as an identifier. In New York State, between 1901 and 1909, drivers made their own from felt, leather, or metal. The first NYS plates had people’s initials:   Once…

Apples, Oranges, and the Global Covid-19 Fiscal Response

Trying to compare the incomparable, we sometimes say it’s like apples and oranges because they are so different. It turns out that they aren’t that different but they’re not really similar either:   The same is true for the Covid-19…

A Goldilocks Look at the U.S. Debt

How to decide if adding $4 trillion (or so) to the U.S. debt is too much, too little, or just right? We can start with ourselves and ask if $200,000 is a lot to borrow when you buy a home.…