Why Sports Stadiums Create Dilemmas

Like all sports projects, renovating Arthur Ashe Stadium requires choosing between most fans and the minority that brings the most revenue.

What Buffet Economics Says About All-You-Can-Eat

Looking at the the supply and demand sides of buffet economics, we see how restaurants and diners manage all-you-can-eat.

All We Need To Know About Pumpkin Slingshots and Fall Farm Festivals

The incentives created by fall farm festival prices shape the money that families spend when they visit a farm on a beautiful autumn day.

How a Cheap Airline Can Be Expensive

Reflecting an unbundled ticket, a list of discount airline fees indicates the extras we can pay for when we fly cheaply.

Where Mount Everest Economics Take Us

Whether looking at its newfound height, the traffic jams, or the role of Nepal, Mount Everest always takes us to the margin.

The Airline Seat Size Squeeze

The problem of airline seat size getting smaller and people getting larger is difficult to solve because comfort and revenue tend to conflict.

Six Surprising Facts About Our Prescription Drug Spending

Called a prescription escalator, our prescription drug spending is more about efficacy and age than the rising prices that we say we see.

Why a Lifetime Pasta Pass is About More Than Spaghetti

The unlimited pasta that Olive Garden’s Never Ending Pasta Pass winners consume reflects a massive change in marginal utility.

What Chuck E. Cheese Teaches Us About Money

When Chuck E. Cheese changed the kinds of payment cards that kids and their parents used for games and food, they created new spending incentives.

When to Worry About Water

Approaching Day Zero, the people in Cape Town South Africa were conserving water by singing two minute shower songs and using 50 liters (13 gallons) a day.