The Online Shopping Nudges We Should Ignore

More than shopping nudges, e-commerce dark patterns are the deceptive and misleading tricks that pressure us into a purchase.

Why Bronze Medal Winners Look So Happy

Economics can explain why Olympic bronze medal winners seem happy while the athletes who won a silver medal might not look as pleased.

How Less is More For Coke

Seeing at our reaction to small packaging like Coke mini, behavioral economists say we buy more of the “regular” amount if it is perceived as a social norm.

Weekly Roundup: From Uber Drivers to Gasoline Prices

Our economic news summary includes labor regulation and Uber, the GDP and streets, gasoline price fluctuation, food and inequality and markets and syrup.

Rockets, Feathers and Gasoline Prices

Gasoline prices rise faster than they fall because monopolistic competition provides retailers with some price control although their product is identical.

One Reason We Think a High Price Looks Low

Through a behavioral economics lens, our reaction to a price relates to a frame or reference point that creates an association with a gain or a loss.

How Less Might Be More At the World Cup

In a study of the Barcelona Olympics, researchers concluded that winners of the bronze medal tended to be happier than the athletes who got the silver. Please look at the expressions (below) of the Olympic medal winners for the 200-meter individual medley at Beijing…

Behavioral Economics: Better than a Psychiatrist

After reading Murder at the Margin, some of my students suggested in essays that we do not need a psychiatrist to explain human behavior. Instead, just ask a behavioral economist. Let’s give it a try… Defaulting: In life, we tend…