The Most Unexpected Market

Like all activities that relate to supply and demand, ransom markets involve predictable behavior from kidnappers, their victims, and negotiators.

How We Spend Our Money

By looking at one hundred years of consumer spending history, we can see how our food, housing, and clothing reflected our growing affluence.

What the IRS Says About Panera’s Pay What You Want

After closing all of their Panera Cares Cafes where customers were supposed “pay what you want,” Panera might have a problem with the IRS.

When $430 Million Is Not Enough

Whether looking at Mike Trout’s $430 million or a newly drafted player, we see athletes whose baseball salaries are called underpaid.

When Awards Give Us More or Less Than We Expect

While awards are all about recognition, inspiration, and appreciation, sometimes they are not exactly what we expect them to be.

When Cash Is Not the Best Thank You

By avoiding repugnant transactions like selling foie gras or human organs, we are eliminating the benefits of the market.

A 2019 Update: The World’s Top and Bottom Laissez-Faire Countries

The Index of Economic Freedom is a handy source of data for judging whether or not a government has a laissez-faire philosophy.

How to Deal With (Airplane Seat) Recline Rage

To recline or not to recline an airplane seat is a problem for passengers and airlines because of pitch, profits, property rights, and your philosophy.

The Pizza War That Pepperoni Started

The chef that left New York’s Prince Street Pizza to start his own restaurant could find himself fighting a pizza war because of his pepperoni recipe.

When Pay-What-You-Want Does Not Quite Work Out

Unexpectedly, Panera’s pay-what-you-want cafes couldn’t bring together the normal lunch crowd and people who could not afford a meal.