The Mystery of the Footlong Sandwich’s Missing Inch

When a Subway footlong is 11 inches and a box of Whoppers is half full, we can ask about the lawsuits that tried to remedy their misleading packaging.

Why a Super Bowl Ad Can Cost $5 Million

Perfect for brands like Snickers and Bud Light, $5 million Super Bowl ads have the audience and the hype that lets large firms share a distinct message.

How a Sound Sells a Product

Suggesting luxury or freshness or just plain pleasing, sometimes product sounds can be an unforgettable competitive tool.

The Importance of the Color of a Soda Can

About more than their recipes, food makers can achieve product differentiation through sound and packaging because taste is multi-sensory.

Weekly Roundup: From Neighborhood Names to Middle Class Jobs

Our weekly roundup includes the tie between chili pepper heat and standardized measures, offshoring and the middle class and neighborhoods and brands.

Why You Should Care About the Name of Your Neighborhood

By branding neighborhoods with new names like DUMBO, SoHo and SoMa, real estate agents signal that gentrification is boosting prices and values.

Why Google Just Got a Parent Called Alphabet

By rebranding Google as Alphabet, it can have a clearly defined parent while Google, as an oligopoly, can keep its brand’s product differentiation.

The Sounds That Can Sell a Product

For monopolistic competition and oligopoly, firms can achieve product differentiation through sounds that are associated with one good or service.

Weekly Roundup: From Drinking Behavior to Dating Decisions

This week’s everyday economics involved 6 economists and such ideas as product differentiation, behavioral economics, marginal utility, price and trade.

What a Blind Taste Test Showed About Beer

Behavioral economic ideas show that product differentiation and consumer preference are more from branding than the taste of colas or beers.