Economic History

US economic history starts with the 13 colonies and the transition from communal to individual land ownership, continues with 19th century economic growth and takes us to the role of services during the 20th century. Involving government, consumers and businesses, at econlife, economic history provides more understanding of today’s economy.

Why Traffic Jams Could Spread Less

First in the nation for pre-Covid gridlock, Boston has a #1 award that no one wants. During 2019, Boston’s average rush hour driver lost 149 hours in congestion. In just five years, traffic congestion will have absorbed a month (730…

Where and Why We Fly (Less)

Looking closely, we see a lot more about where and why we fly for business and leisure travel that can explain the impact of Covid.

What We Can Learn From a Hot Tub

Affecting goods that range from stoves to couches, the causes of pandemic delivery delays can be shown by a disrupted hot tub supply chain.

How a Canal Moved a Bridge

Because of the Panama Canal expansion, a bridge that connects Bayonne, N.J. and Staten Island, N.Y. had to be raised.

A Lesson for Rail Transit From the Eastern Shuttle

Far behind other countries, high-speed rail transit in the U.S. just needs to copy what the Eastern Shuttle long ago did for air travel.

A New Way To See Old Age

Looking back 55 years at the changes in life expectancy, we could decide to change our definition of what it means to be old.

Which Firm Was the First Robinhood?

Similar to the goals expressed by Robinhood, long ago a major Wall Street firm focused on retail investors and also had its IPO.

How to Look at Infrastructure

To see the need for hard and soft infrastructure, we can look back at the catastrophic Donner Party and ahead to contemporary legislation.

Why Taxes Are About More Than Money

Because tax systems matter, we can look at tax evasion in the U.K., at IRS problems in the U.S., and at the OECD to see what works.

How Hamilton Gave Us Independence

Alexander Hamilton’s timeless ideas about public credit, banking, manufacturing, and a transport infrastructure give us economic independence.