Economic History

US economic history starts with the 13 colonies and the transition from communal to individual land ownership, continues with 19th century economic growth and takes us to the role of services during the 20th century. Involving government, consumers and businesses, at econlife, economic history provides more understanding of today’s economy.

How Covid Changed Commuting Time

In its 2021 Urban Mobility Report, Texas A&M tells us how and where Covid vastly changed our commuting time and our traffic congestion.

Where to Find New Capital Cities

Whether looking at Indonesia today or the United States in 1791, moving a capital city can be somewhat similar.

How Stock Markets Have Changed

Celebrating its 125th birthday, we can use the Dow Jones Industrial Average to see how the U.S. economy has changed

Where and Why We Move

Where and why we move takes us to our migration patterns, to our transportation infrastructure, and to truck driver shortages.

When a Tap Told the Time

Undergoing structural change, the 19th century British economy had the problem of factory workers that could not afford alarm clocks.

When Your Gas Tank Is Like Your Bank Account

It is possible that bank runs during the early 1930s can explain the gasoline shortages created by the Colonial Pipeline hacking.

Concrete Decisions for the U.S. Transportation Infrastructure

The transportation component of the Biden infrastructure bill included repairing 10,000 bridges and modernizing 20,000 miles of roads.  It also has plans for air, rail, water, and public transport:   The report from the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)…

Why Car Colors Matter

Choosing car colors is about more than an appearance when we look more closely at resale value, temperature, and theft.

How One Stuck Ship Can Upset a Whole Supply Chain

Just one boat and one waterway, still, the Suez Canal blockage from a wedged in container ship affected the global supply chain.

Why The Gas Tax Could Disappear

Assume (when our lives return to normal) that you drove two miles to Starbucks, then 10 miles to work, and after that you went home. But later, needing gas and food, you once again used your car. Your VMT (vehicle…