Elaine Schwartz
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Elaine Schwartz has spent her career sharing the interesting side of economics. At the Kent Place School in Summit, NJ, she has been honored through an Endowed Chair in Economics and the History Department chairmanship. At the same time, she developed curricula and wrote several books including Understanding Our Economy (originally published by Addison Wesley as Economics Our American Economy) and Econ 101 ½  (Avon Books/Harper Collins). Elaine has also written in the Encyclopedia of New Jersey (Rutgers University Press) and was a featured teacher in the Annenberg/CPB video project “The Economics Classroom.” Beyond the classroom, she has presented Econ 101 ½ talks and led workshops for the Foundation for Teaching Economics, the National Council on Economic Education and for the Concord Coalition.

Hamburger Economics

When U.S. senators consider whether to respond to an undervalued Yuan, they can check the most recent Big Mac Index.  Big Macs are 49% cheaper in China than in the U.S. According to The Economist, we would pay $3.58 for a Big…

Frugal Fatigue?

Some of us are suffering from frugal fatigue. According to a New York psychologist, symptoms could include anxiety, fear, depression, and even the common cold. The cause is stress from watchful, recessionary budgeting which for certain people is no longer…

A One-Handed Economist?

Let’s not look at CDOs, SIVs, ARMs, TIPs or ATMs. Nor do we need specifically to consider credit default swaps, securitization, hedge funds or venture capital. Instead, we can go to the question that Robert Litan asks at the end…

New Financial Products

Instead of a garage or a laboratory, think of an office or a conference room. And, rather than a computer or an aircast, imagine a junk bond or a bank account.  All of these products, at one time were invented.…

Ricardo and China

What happens when you build an airport and nobody uses it?  China has an answer. Although China faces underutilization as it develops its transportation infrastructure in the air, by rail and roads,  it seems to be continuing. China’s policy took me…

Mandate Broccoli?

What if there was a miracle food that helped fight colds, prevent cancer, heart disease, and cataracts, and fostered healthy bones? According to several non-medical web sites, there is one. It’s broccoli. And what if another food promoted diabetes, obesity, osteoporosis, dental cavities, kidney stones, high…

Legislative Jeopardy

Between 1932 and 1934, the Senate’s Pecora Commission, named after its general counsel, amassed 12,000 pages of testimony.  Its focus was the impact of stock exchange practices on banking, securities, and commerce.  Subsequent major financial legislation was based on the work of…

Unintended Consequences

New rules might not always have the results regulators expect.  Starting on April 29, any airplane that sits on the tarmac for longer than 3 hours will be fined up to $27,500 per passenger.  For a Boeing 737, that could mean…

Roads to Prosperity

In Part 1 of the Teaching Company course, “America and the New Global Economy,” Professor Timothy Taylor discusses the origination of the euro. Four goals he says were sought: free movement of people, goods, services, and capital.  Central especially to…

Statistical Fun

Reading that China might be concerned with an annual 3.5 percent inflation rate, I wondered how that compared to other countries and the world.  At a Google site with World Bank data, not only did I get some answers, but I had some fun.  Graphically,…